Tuesday, July 22, 2014 Saturday, July 12, 2014
wnyc:

GOPY

wnyc:

GOPY

(Source: iaminlikewithmybike)

Tuesday, July 8, 2014

koreaunderground:

Antiwar activists carry rocks up a hill and pile them in formations to block construction of a U.S. naval base on South Korea’s JeJu Island, only to have them removed again by authorities.

From photo series, “Repeatedly Destroyed, but Continuously Constructed Art” by Emily Wang, Sung-hee Choi

read more: http://savejejunow.org/portfolio/destroyed-constructed-art/

We must learn and then teach our children that niceness does not equal goodness. Niceness is a decision, a strategy of social interaction; it is not a character trait. People seeking to control others almost always present the image of a nice person in the beginning. Like rapport-building, charm and the deceptive smile, unsolicited niceness often has a discoverable motive. Gavin de Becker
Gavin de Becker - The Gift of FearThe Gift of Fear
(Via R. Mcnamara)

(Source: kindlequotes)

Monday, July 7, 2014
a-spoon-is-born:

longlittleness:

blue-author:

bramblepatch:

from Passing English of the Victorian Era
I’m gonna bring this back if it’s the last thing I do

This is the greatest linguistic discovery in the English language since the pedigree of feels.

those morbs feels

ALL THE MORBS

a-spoon-is-born:

longlittleness:

blue-author:

bramblepatch:

from Passing English of the Victorian Era

I’m gonna bring this back if it’s the last thing I do

This is the greatest linguistic discovery in the English language since the pedigree of feels.

those morbs feels

ALL THE MORBS

Saturday, July 5, 2014

Homeless mom prepares her daughter for school, India. Photo By Gautam Basu.

Homeless mom prepares her daughter for school, India. Photo By Gautam Basu.

(Source: goadthings)

Tuesday, July 1, 2014
chimneyfish:

Woman In the Wilderness, 1923
Alphonse Mucha

chimneyfish:

Woman In the Wilderness, 1923

Alphonse Mucha

2000-lightyearsfromhome:

Rafael Sanz Lobato

2000-lightyearsfromhome:

Rafael Sanz Lobato

almost two years ago now
transplanting strawberries

almost two years ago now

transplanting strawberries

my-little-time-machine:

Giuseppe Primoli 1851

my-little-time-machine:

Giuseppe Primoli 1851

(Source: 0rbs)

Monday, June 30, 2014

abandonedography:

 There’s something particularly eerie about an abandoned shopping mall. Perhaps it’s the stark contrast from its intended purpose: to see such a sterile place once designed to entice throngs of shoppers into its doors, now so completely devoid of any human life, dilapidated and darkened with time. It’s basically the very definition of post-apocalyptic. But in the case of the (now ironically named) New World shopping mall in Bangkok, Thailand, abandonment by humans doesn’t equate with lifelessness. The mall, which reportedly caught fire in 1999 (rumored to be arson by a competitor), has since flooded with several feet of water and become a paradise for koi and catfish.

As seen in these photos from chef / travel writer Jesse Rockwell, the resulting “urban aquarium” is at once delightful and surreal. Rockwell writes on his travel, photography, and food blog A Taste of The Road that someone deliberately introduced the fish (to probably reduce mosquitoes) into the vacant mall, but that locals in Bangkok’s old town “discourage people from visiting it.” He says he had to wait for a policeman to leave before entering, which makes his resulting images all the more breathtaking. (via The Verge)

Saturday, June 28, 2014
ybb55:

Morning Milkweed by Mark Mohr

ybb55:

Morning Milkweed by Mark Mohr

pineandantler:

reindeer
anne katja gaup
It took Adolf Hitler and his Nazi cohorts 12 years to round up and murder 6 million Jews, but their Teutonic cousins, the British, managed to kill almost 4 million Indians in just over a year, with Prime Minister Winston Churchill cheering from the sidelines. Australian biochemist Dr Gideon Polya has called the Bengal Famine a “manmade holocaust” because Churchill’s policies were directly responsible for the disaster. Bengal had a bountiful harvest in 1942, but the British started diverting vast quantities of food grain from India to Britain, contributing to a massive food shortage in the areas comprising present-day West Bengal, Odisha, Bihar and Bangladesh. Author Madhusree Mukerjee tracked down some of the survivors and paints a chilling picture of the effects of hunger and deprivation. In Churchill’s Secret War, she writes: “Parents dumped their starving children into rivers and wells. Many took their lives by throwing themselves in front of trains. Starving people begged for the starchy water in which rice had been boiled. Children ate leaves and vines, yam stems and grass. People were too weak even to cremate their loved ones.”

Remembering India’s Forgotten Holocaust. 

Sarah Waheed notes: “One of the students in my modern South Asia history class a few years ago, was extremely upset that the book we were reading referred to the Bengal famine as a holocaust, calling the author ‘biased’. When I asked him to clarify and elaborate upon what he meant by ‘biased’, he exclaimed, inflamed, “There was only one holocaust!” The rest of the students were, however, more open to the idea of the 20th century being a century of multiple holocausts. The terms ‘holocaust’ and ‘genocide’, however, continue to elicit trauma envy.”

(via mehreenkasana)

I first heard of British crimes like this in Mike Davis’ Late Victorian Holocausts which talks about how imperialism affected the Indian subcontinent’s food supply. The system which could feed everyone, even during hard times, was “centralized” to be “more efficient” by the British administration, leading to skyrocketing poverty and famine and a destroyed local ecology. 

(via jhameia)

Friday, June 27, 2014

(Source: 666jss)